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Filtering by Tag: midwife

Preparing for the Athletic Event of Giving Birth

Chelsea Gonzales

Amber warrior.jpeg

Giving birth is hard work. In fact, many people compare the task to taking part in a huge athletic event. Therefore, it only makes sense to prepare for giving birth in the same way you might prepare for a marathon or something equally physically challenging.

Unfortunately, many women fail to realize this fact and end up with a body that is ill prepared for this difficult task. Of course, they are generally able to power through, and these women truly aren’t doing anything wrong. After all, it isn’t their fault nobody communicated this fact to them.

However, when you know better you do better. I hope after reading this article you know better, and I hope you feel more knowledgeable about the best way to prepare your body for the hard work it is about to do.

Hydrate

All athletes make a conscious effort to stay hydrated both before and during events they choose to attend. It is one of the most important things a person can do when using large amounts of energy.

Considering the fact that birth requires enormous amounts of energy, you will want to be sure you stay well hydrated throughout your pregnancy and during labor. Dehydration is a serious threat during the birthing process, and one you definitely don't want to contend with. 

Eat Well

You’ve probably heard plenty of people claim that pregnant women can eat whatever they like due to their pregnancy. “They’re eating for two” is a common excuse, and cravings frequently take the blame. While it is okay to treat yourself sometimes, the truth of the matter is that eating right during pregnancy is far more important than curbing cravings.

Keep in mind that your body is growing another human. Not only that, but it is going to give birth in a few short months. Therefore, it is crucial that you give your body the right kind of fuel in order to ensure it is in top-notch condition for the task. A marathon runner wouldn’t have ice cream for dinner, and neither should you.

Stretch

Every big athletic event begins with stretching. Stretching helps improve your range of motion and avoid injury. It is a wonderful way to wake your body up before the big event and make sure you are as flexible as necessary for the impending task.

Just as the athlete makes a point of stretching regularly, so should you. Attending a pregnancy yoga class is a great way to go about this, but stretching at home can be just as effective. Just be sure you know what’s safe and what’s not when it comes to the various stretches out there.

Exercise

We all know that a professional tennis player doesn’t head to a big match without first practicing for countless hours. They prepare for months beforehand by practicing their game and using various cross-training methods.

This is a great example of what a pregnant woman should be doing in the months leading up to her baby’s arrival. Of course, her exercise and training can’t and won’t be as intense as that of a professional tennis player, but she should definitely be focused on getting in plenty of exercise through walking, swimming, or anything else her care provider approves. Additionally, exercises such a kegels should be practiced regularly in preparation for the event.

Rest

Last, but certainly not least, is rest. In order for a person’s body to perform well, it has to be given plenty of rest. In fact, a number of professional athletes claim that their 8–10 hours of sleep each night contribute greatly to their successes.

Why should the body of a pregnant woman require any less sleep? Be sure you get plenty of rest during your pregnancy in order to allow your body a good amount of energy during the birthing process.

By paying attention to diet, exercise, and the amount of rest you are getting, you can ensure your body is in tip-top shape for the upcoming athletic event it is about to experience. This will help ensure you have the experience you desire and make the whole process a bit easier on your entire body.

The differences between a Birth Doula and a Midwife Assistant

Megan Jennings

Every expectant mother must assemble a birth team. Building a strong birth team with professionals who respect your birthing wishes is a very important part of ensuring you have a satisfactory birth experience. Unfortunately, many mamas-to-be don’t fully understand the role of each member on a birth team, and this makes choosing the right team members difficult, to say the least. 

One of the biggest sources of confusion is the difference between a doula and a midwife’s assistant. Lacking the definition of each can lead to a confusing situation for new mothers as they try to navigate the world of care providers and birth plans. 

In this article we are going to explore the role of each respective care provider in order to give you a strong foundation of knowledge when choosing your team. 

Doula

In short, a doula attends a birth in order to support the laboring mama. She is excellent at anticipating the personal needs of a birthing woman, and does her best to tend to those needs. This might involve making sure the new mother is eating or drinking throughout labor, or offering her support in whatever position makes her comfortable. It could also entail using oils or massages in order to help her client relax. 

While a doula will have a large amount of knowledge about the female anatomy and the birthing process, she will never administer medical care of any kind. Instead, she remains by the laboring mother’s side as much as possible and makes her as content as possible. 

Another part of a doula’s job includes helping the new mother and father to advocate for themselves throughout the labor and delivery of their child. This is especially important if the labor is to take place in a hospital setting or if complications should arise. 

Most doulas are on call 24/7, and will arrive to offer labor support as soon as a woman feels she needs it. A doula generally brings a collection of supplies with her, which may include a birth ball, a rebozo (a scarf used for a variety of purposes during labor), essential oils, massage oil, and a variety of other tools for keeping mama comfortable and happy. 

Midwife’s Assistant

On the other hand, a midwife’s assistant attends a birth in order to help the midwife do her job. While she may offer the new mother some support and words of encouragement, this is not her number one priority. Instead, she is present to help the midwife with anything and everything she might need an extra set of hands for. 

Unlike a doula, a midwife’s assistant does administer some basic medical care. Therefore, she must have a very good understanding of the female anatomy and the labor and delivery process. 

A midwife’s assistant might perform such tasks as watching the mother’s vital signs and monitoring fetal heart tones. She is also given the tasks of assisting with any medical management (if needed), assisting with charting, providing immediate postpartum care to mom and baby, and performing a variety of other jobs that arise throughout the labor and delivery process. 

Because her job is so varied, a midwife’s assistant must be very in-tune with her surroundings and anticipate the midwife’s needs as often as possible. This will help the midwife stay on task throughout the delivery, as everything she needs will be prepared for her. 

The majority of midwife’s assistants are on call 24/7, but many will not arrive until later in the laboring process. The supplies found in a midwife’s assistant’s bag might include a fetal Doppler, a stethoscope, an infant scale, and record-taking supplies. 

Overlap

While doulas and midwife’s assistants do offer two different kinds of services, there is occasionally some overlap in their job descriptions. For instance, many doulas offer breastfeeding support after baby is born. Likewise, many midwife’s assistants offer support in this area as well.

Other areas of overlap could include:

Offering the laboring mother support.

Helping with post-birth cleanup.

Assisting with skin-to-skin.

Conclusion

Although there is a bit of overlap between the roles of these two types of caregivers, they do both offer their own unique services.

Therefore, if your birth will be attended by a midwife, it is generally a good idea to consider having both a doula and a midwife’s assistant attend your birth as well. However, if you are planning a hospital birth with an OB, a midwife’s assistant is not necessary, but a doula is a definite must.